What's in bloom at the Toronto Botanical Garden

Archive for September, 2010

>Sept. 23- 30

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In the Nature Garden you will find:
Lindera benzoin (Spicebush); from the laurel family; the leaves of this native shrub give off a unique spicy odour when touched, bearing rich red fruit in late summer through fall; prefers a rich, moist location

In the Nature Garden:
Chelone lyonii (Turtlehead); deep green foliage topped with rose pink turtle
head-shaped flowers in late summer through early fall(foreground right), a native perennial preferring rich moist soil. It is shown here with Physostegia virginiana (Obedient Plant) and on the left, Symphyotrichum novae-anglicae (formerly Aster novae-angliae) (New England Aster)

In the Show Garden:

Pinus parviflora ‘Hagoromo’ (Japanese White Pine; this dense, slow-growing conifer has attractive blue-green needles; it prefers full sun and may reach a mature size of ten feet by 18 feet in a decade

In the Show Garden:

Berberis thunbergii forma atropurpurea ‘Concorde’ (Red Japanese Barberry); this deciduous thorny shrub has a slow, dense growth habit with rich burgundy foliage and red berries that last through winter

In the Show Garden:
Callicarpa dichotama ‘Early Amethyst’ (Purple Beauty Berry); Callicarpa is Greek for beautiful fruit – thus the name Beauty Berry and indeed these hardy deciduous shurbs are adorned with a profusion of blossy purple berries against liime green foliage which appear earlier than any other cultivar and last through autumn into winter

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>Sept 9 -23

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In the Perennial Border you will find:
Hibiscus ‘Kopper King’ (Perennial hibiscus); still growing strong, Kopper King has been flowering non-stop for over a month even though each plate-sized flower lasts no more than a day or two

In the Perennial Border – North:

Sedum spectabile ‘Neon’ (Stonecrop); Sedums are popular among northern gardeners as they are easy to grow and very hardy. This selection is more compact than some with bright neon-pink showy flowers

In the Perennial Border:

Caryopteris x clandonensis ‘Worchester Gold’ (Blue Beard) with Sedum ‘Autumn Fire’ (Stonecrop); Worchester Gold has warm yellow to chartreuse foliage with lavender-blue flowers from late summer to early autumn, showen here with Autumn Fire, one of the best stonecrops.

In the Garden Hall Courtyard – Water Channel:

Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf Hydrangea); native to the American south, this slow-growing hydrangea shrub is a great compliment to any border for its long flower display and characteristic oak-leaf foliage which turns many shades of bronze with autumn; shown her with Miscanthus sinensis ‘Super Stripe’

In the Arrival Courtyard:

Miscanthus ‘Purpurascens’ (Flame Grass); this excellent cultivar has great fall colour with strong upright habit and extreme cold hardiness for Canadian winters